TABRIZ


TABRIZ
TABRIZ, capital of the Third Province, N.W. Iran . A Jewish community existed in Tabriz in the Middle Ages. Samauʾal b. Yahya al-Maghribī, 12th-century author of Ifhām al-Yahūd, mentions Tabriz, together with Salmas (Shahpur) and Khoi, as a place where the followers of the pseudo-messiah david alroy continued to adhere to his movement. From the time of Hulagu Khan, Tabriz became the capital of the realm of the Ilkhan dynasty. There the Jewish physician Sa ʿ d al-Dawla was appointed vizier of the Il-khan ruler Arghūn, exercising considerable power until his assassination in 1291; and the vizier, historian, and physician rashid al-din served three rulers until his tragic death in 1318. As attested by Hebrew manuscripts written by scholars in Tabriz and the vicinity, the Jewish community consisted of both Karaites and Rabbanites. The karaite physician Nafis b. Daud at-Tabrizi moved in 1354 from Tabriz to cairo , where he was converted to Islam. In the 16th century the Yemenite traveler Zechariah al-Ḍāhiri visited Tabriz and described in his Sefer ha-Musar the deteriorating conditions of Jewish life there. The wave of persecutions which swept over the whole of persia under the Safavid rulers ʿ Abbas I and ʿ Abbas II severely affected the Jews of Tabriz also, as indicated by the Armenian historian Akel and the Judeo-Persian chroniclers babai ibn lutf and Babai ibn Farḥad. However, the Jewish community survived these persecutions, since between 1711 and 1713 R. Judah b. Amram Diwan, an emissary from Hebron, included Tabriz among his visits to Jewish communities in Persia. Between 1790 and 1797, Jews in Tabriz were accused of a blood libel and massacred. When David d'Beth Hillel visited Persia in 1828, the Jewish community in Tabriz had already ceased to exist. -BIBLIOGRAPHY: Fischel, Islam, passim; idem, in: PAAJR, 22 (1953), 1–21; Mann, Texts, 1 (1931), 477–549. ADD BIBLIOGRAPHY: H. Levy, The History of the Jews of Iran (in Persian), 3 (1960), 540–2; A. Netzer, "The Fate of the Jewish Community of Tabriz," in: Studies in Islamic History and Civilization in Honor of Professor David Ayalon (1986), 411–19. (Walter Joseph Fischel / Amnon Netzer (2nd ed.)

Encyclopedia Judaica. 1971.

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  • Tabriz — (تبریز) es una ciudad de Irán, con una población de alrededor de 2,5 millones de habitantes. Es el centro de la provincia de Azerbaiyán Oriental. La ciudad está localizada en el noroeste de Irán al norte de la cordillera de Sahand. * * * (Täbriz) …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • TABRIZ — TABR 壟Z Chef lieu de la province iranienne de l’Azerbaïdjan e Sharqui (65 842 km2; 4 390 000 habitants lors du recensement de 1991), Tabr 稜z se trouve au carrefour des routes et des voies ferrées reliant le plateau iranien à la mer Noire et aux… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Tabriz — Tabriz1 [tə brēz′] n. [after TABRIZ2] a Persian rug usually having a stiff pile and a medallion center with an arabesque border Tabriz2 [tä brēz′] city in NW Iran: pop. 1,089,000 …   English World dictionary

  • Tabriz — Infobox Settlement official name = Tabriz other name = native name = تبریز nickname = The City of Firsts settlement type = motto = image size = image caption = Tabriz City Hall, built in 1934, by Arfa ol molk , with the aid of German engineers.… …   Wikipedia

  • Tabriz — 38° 04′ 48″ N 46° 17′ 31″ E / 38.08, 46.2919444 …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Tabriz — تبریز Tabriz …   Wikipedia Español

  • Tabriz — Täbris DEC …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Täbriz — Täbris DEC …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Tabriz — /tah breez , teuh /, n. a city in and the capital of Eastern Azerbaijan province, in NW Iran. 403,413. * * * City (pop., 1996: 1,191,043), northwestern Iran. Earthquakes and invasions by Arabs, Turks, and Mongols have damaged the city numerous… …   Universalium

  • Tabriz — I. noun (plural Tabriz) Etymology: Tabriz, Iran Date: 1900 a Persian rug usually having a cotton warp, firm wool pile, and a medallion design II. geographical name city NW Iran in Azerbaijan population 971,482 …   New Collegiate Dictionary


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